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Confessions of an Adult Visual Learner

by Sarah K Major February 04, 2016

Confessions of an Adult Visual Learner

... Me.

I suspect a lot of people start out to do something only to arrive at their destination without a clue why they went there. However, I do this ALL the time. I have secretly accused myself of lacking sufficient attention, sometimes I blame it on overload, but upon further reflection I think my issue has a lot to do with the fact that I’m a visual-spatial person.

At work this is what happens: someone asks me for something they need from me. I chirp, “Sure” and head to my office to do it with great enthusiasm. The instant I sit down, my memory is wiped clean. My poor colleagues most often have to ask once or twice before they actually get what they need from me. I am chagrined; I am confident having to do this is not only a time waster for them, but annoying and counterproductive in general!

Apart from carrying an overload of information in my brain, I suspect another culprit is my messy desk. I tend to drop things on it to handle “in a bit” and what happens when I rush to my office to complete a task for someone is that the instant I sit down and see all those reminders of other tasks, the visual is more powerful than the auditory request someone made just seconds prior.

Adult visual learner

 What to do, what to do?

Last time a patient co-worker made a second request, I suggested she visual learnerput a tiny sticky note on the edge of my computer screen. I felt a bit cheesy asking them to do this, but honestly, the visual reminder placed in my line of vision would prove to be a powerful aid.

Another help is that we’ve installed whiteboards in our offices with cute little stainless wire baskets mounted on the wall to hold colorful dry erase markers. The boards are supposed to hold our current and upcoming tasks. My board is used less than it should be. When I DO use the whiteboard to list my tasks, it works wonders. I LOVE being able to wipe off tasks and there is a nasty rumor circulating that sometimes I write tasks down just so I can wipe them off!

Another help is that we’ve installed whiteboards in our offices with cute little stainless wire baskets mounted on the wall to hold colorful dry erase markers. The boards are supposed to hold our o

Visual/Spatial learners

Help for the Visual-Spatial Child

How can we tailor this scenario to the visual-spatial child? I think any child would enjoy having a little whiteboard mounted with a dangling, colorful dry erase marker on which a parent or the child himself could write a to-do list. It sure beats nagging or assuming the child just neglected to complete a task! You can buy dry erase surfaces with a sticky back that make it really easy to mount on a door, desk or wall. If you help a child get into the habit of writing on the board the reminders of what they are to do (or draw pictures if they cannot write yet) life will be sweeter for everyone!

Remember, your visual learner will probably forget what he hears but will remember what he sees!





Sarah K Major
Sarah K Major

Author

Sarah's absolute belief in every child’s ability to learn, and her passion to empower the child by supporting his/her own unique giftedness have fueled her life’s work and provided a new pathway for children to succeed academically.


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